Red Tape For Seaplanes In Western Australia

Image from file

Red Tape For Seaplanes In Western Australia

Opening minds on a state legislator level to consider the Eco-tourism impact of seaplanes isn’t exactly a simple task as we know from history. In various locations around the globe, seaplane operators are struggling with expanding their businesses or opening water in efforts to boost their business. The struggle is shared by Horizontal Falls Seaplanes in Western Australia – an award winning tourism booster who would like to expand.

Red Tape

Image from file

Tourism Council WA chief executive Evan Hall has stepped up to the challenge and claims that red tape is holding back eco-tourism and called for the State government to allow new tourism products. Incidentally he runs into the same steel wall that Horizontal Falls Seaplane’s CEO runs into, as the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation keeps swinging a highly aged regulation from 1981, to keep a lid on any and all seaplane activity within their jurisdiction.

Hall thinks that legislative reform is overdue in an environment that greatly prospers from its tourism. The argument is that “throwing the baby out with the bathwater” isn’t going to allow for growth in the area.

Western Australia’s Water Minister Dave Kelly states that supporting new tourism ventures, where possible, to create more jobs and grow the local economy is a key priority for the Government. He tells local media that he has asked the department for advice on the matter.

“I understand that Peel-Harvey Estuary is habitat to internationally and federally protected bird species and list as a Ramsar wetland of international importance. Given that our natural environment is one of our biggest tourism draw-cards we need to ensure we are not impacting on it through any new tourism operations.”