Alpine Aviation Seeks Clarity For The Future

Image: Courtesy of Alpine Aviation

Alpine Aviation Seeks Clarity For The Future

Opinion Editorial written by Jason J. Baker — For those in the Seaplane industry who’s life revolves around more than non-profit fundraising, partying and desperately appearing to be of significance in shaping tomorrows industry environment, things are fairly simple. Fight for yourself, seek regulatory clarity, form and groom alliances and continuously work in good faith, on workable – long term solutions for your little business corner of paradise.

Image: Courtesy of Alpine Aviation

For the folks at Alpine Aviation, who have been flying out of Schwatka Lake for some 22 years, this activity has been the main foci for quite a while. Fighting for something with only local and often artificially limited support is a tiring and burnout- fostering activity and one could wonder how many times Janet Sanders and Gerd Mannsperger may have thought about throwing in the towel. Hostility against our “out of the ordinary activity” is at an all time high, these days. Uncertainty about the future set-up prevents investing in further growth and it greatly affects people’s ability to seek opportunities. Basically a mirror image you see here, with your Seaplanemagazine.com

The City of Whitehorse is celebrating “Small Business Week” and incidentally Alpine Aviation is a small business! The opportunity to remind city officials about this fact could and should not go unused and at least for Mannsperger and Sanders it didn’t. In a open letter, both entrepreneurs reminded the city that they are still around and looking for a commitment from the city for a sustainable future. They also reminded city officials that they are hoping for good faith negotiations, round tables and equal treatment. Equality seems to be a very large problem in today’s environment of politics. But our industry also more often than not collectively fails to accomplish a united approach to tackling challenges. What happens to Alpine can happen to all of us!

I still find it necessary to point the City of Whitehorse’s attention to the insanity of having to ask local government for common courtesy and professionalism, which should be standard to all and a matter of civil courtesy and respect.

We feel that we are not necessarily entering into good faith discussions. We feel that any headway we make on the dock issue will be met with retribution in the form of additional conditions on our other permits, regarding the office structure.  We feel this way because this is what we have experienced over the past. We certainly hope that we are wrong in this assumption.

The strange thing I refer to here is also known as working hard to find “common sense” solutions and avoiding arbitrary and capricious behavior in finding these solutions. If small business is of more than symbolic character and subject to more than collective “lets all feel good and sing Kumbaya” doctrines, the city is now under sincere pressure to step up to the challenge and come to grips on fair and equal treatment. Alpine Aviation (among many others) is a business that should be a pride for the local community to have and sustain. No business should ever have to guard against bias and unfairness. It is my take that the City of Whitehorse is now obliged to deliver.

Jason Baker is the owner and managing editor of Seaplanemagazine.com. He works as a slf employed marketing and public relations consultant for struggling aviation companies who have already figured out that social media appearance and fake- popularity is not a basis for sustainable business. The dual citizen speaks English and German and also offers translation services. Jason holds a commercial pilot certificate and instrument rating for single and multi engine aircraft and is further a ground instructor. To get in touch, please reach out via [email protected]